Marjorie Taylor Greene goes full-blown Dolores Umbridge with claims about Democrats and firing squads

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Unless someone finally puts a stop to it, Marjorie Taylor Greene’s relentless stream of thoughtless comments seems inescapable.

For several years now, the 49-year-old Congresswoman has continually pushed the boundaries of what Republicans will say and do to remain in the spotlight. Her latest outburst targets the “Democrat-controlled DOJ, federal government, and Congress,” showcasing her limited understanding of national issues.

In her recent post on X, Greene lashed out at her colleagues and the media, accusing them of keeping voters “addicted to outrage”—a tactic she herself frequently employs. Greene’s strategy often involves inciting false outrage over trivial matters, assuming the public won’t notice her manipulations. And if they do, she’s ready to lie to keep fueling her next baseless rant.

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Her latest tirade is a jumbled mess, jumping erratically from Trump’s criminal trial and Steve Bannon’s impending prison time to abortion rights, national debt, and border issues. Despite touching on numerous topics, she fails to make a coherent point.

As usual, Greene’s complaints are tone-deaf and often contradict her own party’s policies. It’s ironic for her to accuse Democrats of leading Republicans to a “firing squad” when her party resists gun regulation. Agreeing to some gun control might alleviate her fears of a “firing squad.”

Greene’s lament about various individuals facing prison sentences seems almost like a troll post. She lists Trump’s legal troubles, Bannon’s and Peter Navarro’s impending jail time, and the consequences faced by Jan. 6 rioters, all of whom are dealing with the fallout of their actions.

Her latest tweet reads like a parody of Dolores Umbridge’s Educational Decrees from Harry Potter—a fitting comparison for the widely disliked Congresswoman, though Greene lacks Umbridge’s intelligence. While Greene may be a villain of fantastical proportions, her comprehension and vocabulary leave much to be desired.